ART HELP:

corporalbutts:

Cutting to the chase I am doing a project for my art class that requires me to do a piece that is 60ftx1ft long.

60 feet is a HUGE size.

Long story short, I need your URLs, and if you reblog/like this post I will write your URL down on my piece.

I NEED 60 FEET OF URLS AND I HAVE SMALL HANDWRITING. PLEASE REBLOG FOR ONE REASON, AND ONE REASON ONLY:

image

penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info
penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info
penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info
penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info
penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info
penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info
penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info
penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info
penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info
penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.
To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.
"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"
Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 
It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.
Zoom Info

penguinsledding:

carebearkidd:

thedeadhatter:

chaosunit0010:

Why the hell were these guys in prison.

Probably for being the only fucking sane people in the entire town.

Nah, bro, I bet they’re legit criminals. And this scene does things for us as the audience: it humanizes these villains for one. Prisoners are people too, something that (at east in the US), we tend to fucking forget. For two, we only see them as sympathetic because of Aang. There’s a Jesus motif here, because Aang doesn’t judge them based on their past. It emphasizes Aang’s character as a monk.

To contrast, if Sokka was the one thrown in this cell, he—as a “water tribe warrior” would be less tolerant of the criminals and they’d simply be background characters, props to emphasize the terrible environment Sokka is in.

"Why the hell were these guys in prison?"

Well, they broke the law and it’s as simple as that. It’s the same for prisoners in the real world, and chances are you wouldn’t know you were talking to one unless you sat in his cell with him, like Aang does. And he still isn’t judging.

YES. That’s one of the best things about Avatar, in my opinion. We see over and over again that the “villains” are human. It introduces us to sympathetic Fire Nation character after Fire Nation character, while showing us characters from our “heroic” nations who are not the heroes they should be. 

It’s also one of the best things about Aang. He is so sweet and loving, and he doesn’t think anyone is undeserving of that love.